since you have read this post you will be told…

Regular post

Never forget

swagintherain:

Never forget

Photo

Photo

Black herbalism series: African Herbalism | A …

Black herbalism series: African Herbalism | A Tribe of 3 Sisters Herbal:

aerie-well:

ancestralmedicinemagic:

ancestralmedicinemagic:

ancestralmedicinemagic:

I finally have my webinar! It’s only $5, but there are only 60 spaces so get it while you can, and only 30 people can order booklets to go with the webinar. Over 100 people requested it, so if we run out of spaces, I might do another one, but for right now, this is all there is. 

Because I had to change it to a product instead of a booking I am giving a free shipping code, because what do you need to ship for? You can use it on any product or you can use it on the webinar, but you can only use it once.

Code: Webinar

Also, if you were wondering this webinar is the beginning of a series of black herbalism practices around the world.

This course is for everyone, though of course the audience is black folk. It is OK if you want to support a black herbalist!

Do not forget the Free shipping code: Webinar

jenbartel:

jenbartel:

Becoming Dangerous

The Reiki in this photo is for discernment. …

The Reiki in this photo is for discernment. Here is a link to the corresponding video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X5cbqmybP0g  For more information on Reiki and my services, please go to my website, www.restrelaxationandreiki.com Blessings, Lourdes #restrelaxationreiki 

Raven Symbolism

There’s more than one facet to every beautiful gemstone, and the raven is definitely a unique jewel when it comes to symbolism. Visions of ravens descending upon blood-soaked battlefields to jab their coal black beaks into the carrion of war make for a bird that’s very hard for some to think positively of, but there’s a lot more to the raven than its scavenger tendencies! And, as I hope you’ll see, there are very positive ways to think of the raven’s diet.

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The raven is, naturally, associated with war and war gods, and all that entails. Conflict, bloodshed, warriors, death, despair… It’s not hard to see why ravens aren’t fondly regarded in symbolism. Ravens are associated with the Morrigan, a powerful Celtic war goddess who garners much fear and respect.

However, one must also remember that ravens are intelligent, playful creatures who love to chatter and have fun! Odin, the All-Father of the Norse gods, kept two ravens by his side who would fly out each day and report back to him on news of the world. Hugin and Mugin reflect the intellectual side of ravens as creatures of the Air, the element of thought, reason, and intellect.

Ravens are incredibly intelligent, but are also one of nature’s most playful birds! Watching how ravens roll around in the snow just for fun reminds us to have fun as we indulge our curiosity and hunger for knowledge, be it into the occult or anything else. While ravens are known as keepers of mystical lore, however, they also have a penchant for being blabbermouths in mythology. Greek myth holds that Apollo scorched the raven’s feathers from white to black because it couldn’t keep a secret for anything!

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There’s much more to say about the raven in terms of its connection with the sun and with transformation, but to wrap up this post, I want to discuss a lesson the raven has to teach us with regard to the trait that people dislike the most: its habit of scavenging dead meat.

What, you might ask, could we possibly take away from this in a positive sense? Well, think of it this way: nature can get messy, and if someone doesn’t clean up that mess, then things could get extremely nasty and toxic. In much the same way, when the human mind holds onto thoughts, ideas, or feelings that just weigh us down, they can fester and poison us from the inside out.

So, the raven’s lesson in this regard is that sometimes, you need to get rid of old mental baggage that’s not serving you anymore. It’s not nearly as easy as just making the decision to forget about it, and requires some hard work and education in new ways of thinking; however, it is well worth the effort.

I was inspired to make this post by finding out that, like how the Butterfly is my Celtic Zodiac Sign, the Raven is my Native American Zodiac Sign. There’s also a raven that lives close to my house that I see from time to time, and it finally struck me that I should make a post on raven symbolism!

I hope it gives you all some inspiration!

witch-vomit: My neighbors all have the most b…

witch-vomit:

My neighbors all have the most beautiful flowers blooming in their yards….I’m in love. 😍⚘🌸💋💕🌼

Yunnan Jig

I had some trouble sleeping last night, so I decided to make a cup of black tea as a little pick me up! It’s a variety by Adagio called Yunnan Jig, and while I don’t think I got the water hot enough to really bring out the full depth of flavor, I love the refined taste to it! 

I also added some raw mountain flower honey to sweeten it a bit, and to help me with my sugar withdrawal. Studies seem to show that honey actually helps to lower the amount of sugar in your bloodstream, and raw, unprocessed honey is especially good for you! There are also lots of antioxidants in honey!

aliciarobinsonart: Water Nymph 

aliciarobinsonart:

Water Nymph